In 2004 the Federal Emergency Management Agency launched a campaign to make sure citizens were taking steps to be prepared for emergencies in their homes, schools, businesses and the communities they lived in. These emergencies included natural disasters and potential terrorist attacks. The campaign is called National Preparedness Month and it’s traditionally taken place during the month of September. 5.11 will share with you, gear, tips and share videos all month long to help you be better prepared to respond. From mindset to gear selection we will have you covered.

“Prepared, Not Scared”

The theme for National Preparedness Month is “Prepared, Not Scared”. Besides the content we will be releasing all month, Ready.gov has outlined their weekly themes to help you do a check of your readiness and aid in planning to ensure you and your family are prepared and ready in case of an emergency.

Save Early for Disaster Costs

Recommendations include making sure your insurance is up to date and covers disasters that affect your area. Understanding and having a financial plan in place in case of disasters. Also having some cash on hand in case of power loss and lack of access to ATM’s. It’s also a great idea to have important financial documents printed out and kept safe. By visiting the website you can get PDF’s of a checklist of what is recommended to have on hand.

Make a Plan

Even if you have all the gear and supplies you still need a plan. The plan should include what to do in case of a mandatory evacuation of your home or business. Meeting places for the family in case of communication break downs. Practice drills of what you will be grabbing while evacuating. “Failure to plan is planning to fail”.

Youth Preparedness

Having your kids being involved in any preparedness plan is important. Include them in the planning process. Besides preparing for home disasters, kids should be ready and educated to navigate disasters at schools. Most schools have programs in place but it’s recommended you discuss those procedures with them as well. For more info to help plan or talk with your kids visit ready.gov/kids

Community Preparedness

You know the saying, “It takes a village” and your local community or neighborhood can be a key element in having a successful preparedness plan. Organizing events that teach basic first aid skills, neighborhood watches and having a plan to check on neighbors who might have disabilities or be older during natural disasters all lead to a more connected and ready community.

Stay Tuned

All month long we’ll be sharing content about being prepared and with a quick query on your favorite search engine you can find a vast collection of articles related to being prepared. Below are just a couple we featured here a while ago. Share with us on our social channels your favorite articles and/or tips you think we can all benefit from. Always Be Ready.

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